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International Ski Federation (FIS) Profile

By

International Ski Federation Logo

International Ski Federation Logo

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Skiers vs. snowboarders is a longstanding rivalry in winter sports, but snowboarders might soften up if they realized that the International Ski Federation (FIS) was responsible for many great advancements of the sport of snowboarding, most notably its inclusion in the Olympics. The FIS is now responsible for setting the international rules for snowboard competition, including the Olympics and thousands of snowboard competitions around the world each year.

In May, 1994, the sport of snowboarding changed forever. The FIS congress decided to include men's and women's snowboarding in its competitive circuit, along with the decision, applied for snowboarding to become an official Winter Olympic sport. The FIS organized the first Snowboard FIS World Cup in the winter of 1994-95. The 23 competitions were held at nine different mountains in the United States, Canada, Japan, Germany, Italy, France, and Austria. The very first FIS World Cup competition was held on November 26, 1994 in Kaprun, Austria.

The following year, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) agreed to make snowboarding an official Olympic sport, which fuelled snowboarding's increasing popularity. The FIS World Cup expanded to 33 contests at 14 venues, and in 1996, the first FIS Snowboard World Championships were held in Lienz, Austria. Giant Slalom, Parallel Slalom, and Halfpipe were the first events included in the championships, and Snowboard Cross was brought on board the following year. The World Snowboard Championships were planned to occur every season, but the schedule changed to every odd year after 1997.

Thanks to the FIS, snowboarding became an official sport in the 1998 Winter Olympics, and giant slalom and halfpipe competitions were held. The FIS World Cup expanded to 41 competitions on 17 mountains in nine countries by the 1999-2000 season, and in 2001, Men's Big Air was added as an official event. The list of venues expanded at a rapidly; every country with a world-class ski resort wanted to hold a World Cup event. By the 2006-07 season, competitions had been held in Germany, Austria, Italy, the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, Spain, Korea, Russia, Canada, Finland, and a number of other countries.

Star snowboarders continued to be discovered on the FIS World Cup circuit and the Olympics and snowboarding began to be recognized as a mainstream sport. Each year, riders from around the world would compete in Halfpipe, Big Air, Slopestyle, Snowboard Cross, Parallel Slalom, and Parallel Giant Slalom to solidify their place among the best riders in the world.

International Ski Federation (FIS) History

In May, 1994, the sport of snowboarding changed forever. The FIS congress decided to include men's and women's snowboarding in its competitive circuit, along with the decision, applied for snowboarding to become an official Winter Olympic sport. The FIS organized the first Snowboard FIS World Cup in the winter of 1994-95. The 23 competitions were held at nine different mountains in the United States, Canada, Japan, Germany, Italy, France, and Austria. The very first FIS World Cup competition was held on November 26, 1994 in Kaprun, Austria.

The following year, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) agreed to make snowboarding an official Olympic sport, which fuelled snowboarding's increasing popularity. The FIS World Cup expanded to 33 contests at 14 venues, and in 1996, the first FIS Snowboard World Championships were held in Lienz, Austria. Giant Slalom, Parallel Slalom, and Halfpipe were the first events included in the championships, and Snowboard Cross was brought on board the following year. The World Snowboard Championships were planned to occur every season, but the schedule changed to every odd year after 1997.

Thanks to the FIS, snowboarding became an official sport in the 1998 Winter Olympics, and giant slalom and halfpipe competitions were held. The FIS World Cup expanded to 41 competitions on 17 mountains in nine countries by the 1999-2000 season, and in 2001, Men's Big Air was added as an official event. The list of venues expanded at a rapidly; every country with a world-class ski resort wanted to hold a World Cup event. By the 2006-07 season, competitions had been held in Germany, Austria, Italy, the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, Spain, Korea, Russia, Canada, Finland, and a number of other countries.

Star snowboarders continued to be discovered on the FIS World Cup circuit and the Olympics and snowboarding began to be recognized as a mainstream sport. Each year, riders from around the world would compete in Halfpipe, Big Air, Slopestyle, Snowboard Cross, Parallel Slalom, and Parallel Giant Slalom to solidify their place among the best riders in the world.



 International Ski Federation (FIS) World Cup Snowboard Events
  • Halfpipe
  • Slopestyle
  • Snowboard Cross
  • Parallel Giant Slalom
  • Parallel Slalom
  • Big Air (Men's)
International Ski Federation (FIS) Disciplines International Ski Federation (FIS) Snowboard World Championships Medalists

1996

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Ivo Rudiferia
Silver:
Rainer Krug
Bronze:
Helmut Pramstaller

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Ross Powers
Silver: Lael Gregory
Bronze: Rob Kingwill

Men's Giant Slalom
Gold: Jeff Greenwood
Silver: Mike Jacoby
Bronze: Helmut Pramstaller

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Marion Posch
Silver: Marcella Boerma
Bronze: Sondra van Ert

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Caroline Van Kilsdonk
Silver: Annemarie Uliasz
Bronze: Cammy Potter

Women's Giant Slalom
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Manuela Riegler
Bronze: Sondra van Ert

1997

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Mike Jacoby
Silver: Elmar Messner
Bronze: Bernd Kroschewski

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Fabien Rohrer
Silver: Markus Hurme
Bronze: Roger Hjelmstadstuen

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Helmut Pramstaller
Silver: Klaus Stammer
Bronze: Jakog Bergstedt

Men's Giant Slalom
Gold: Thomas Prugger
Silver: Mike Jacoby
Bronze: Ian Price

Men's Slalom
Gold: Bernd Kroschewski
Silver: Dieter Moherndi
Bronze: Anton Pogue

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Dagmar Mair Unter Der Eggen
Silver: Karine Ruby
Bronze: Marie Birkl

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Anita Schwaller
Silver: Christel Thoresen
Bronze: Sabine Wehr-Hasler

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Manuela Riegler
Bronze: Maria Kirchgasser-Pichler

Women's Giant Slalom
Gold: Sondra van Ert
Silver: Karine Ruby
Bronze: Margherita Parini

Women's Slalom
Gold: Heidi Renoth
Silver: Dagmar Mair Unter Der Eggen
Bronze: Dorothee Fournier

1999

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Nicolas Huet
Silver: Mathieu Bozzetto
Bronze: Werner Ebenbauer

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Ricky Bower
Silver: Frederick Sterner
Bronze: Timo Aho

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Henrik Jansson
Silver: Magnus Sterner
Bronze: Zeke Steggall

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Richard Rikardsson
Silver: Stefan Kaltscheutz
Bronze: Herald Walter

Men's Giant Slalom
Gold: Markus Ebner
Silver: Maxence Idesheim
Bronze: Stefan Kaltscheutz

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Marion Posch
Silver: Isabelle Blanc
Bronze: Sandra Farmand

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Kim Stacey
Silver: Doriane Vidal
Bronze: Anna Hellman

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Julie Pomagalski
Silver: Maria Tikhvinskaja
Bronze: Olivia Guerry

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Isabelle Blanc
Silver: Rosey Fletcher
Bronze: Aasa Windahl

Women's GIant Slalom
Gold: Margherita Parini
Silver: Lidia Trettel
Bronze: Sandra van Ert

2001

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Gilles Jacquet
Silver: Daniel Biveson
Bronze: Setfan Kaltschuetz

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Kim Christiansen
Silver: Daniel Franck
Bronze: Markus Herme

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Guillaume Nantermod
Silver: Markus Ebner
Bronze: Alexander Maier

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Nicolas Huet
Silver: Mathieu Chiquet
Bronze: Anton Pogue

Men's Giant Slalom
Gold: Jasey Jay Anderson
Silver: Dejan Kosir
Bronze: Walter Feichter

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Isabelle Blanc
Bronze: Carmen Ranigler

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Doriane Vidal
Silver: Stine Kjeldaas
Bronze: Sari Gronholm

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Emmanuelle Duboc
Bronze: Dominique Vallee

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Ursula Bruhin
Silver: Rosey Fletcher
Bronze: Manuela Riegler

Women's GIant Slalom
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Isabelle Blanc
Bronze: Daigmer Mar Unter der Eggen

2003

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Siegfried Grabner
Silver: Mathieu Bozzetto
Bronze: Simon Schoch

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Markus Keller
Silver: Stefan Karlsson
Bronze: Steve Fisher

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Xavier de Le Rue
Silver: Seth Wescott
Bronze: Drew Neilson

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Dejan Kosir
Silver: Simon Schoch
Bronze: Nicolas Huet

Men's Big Air
Gold: Risto Mattila
Silver: Simon Ax
Bronze: Antti Autti

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Isabelle Blanc
Silver: Karine Ruby
Bronze: Sara Fischer

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Doriane Vidal
Silver: Nicola Pederzolli
Bronze: Fabienne Reuteler

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Karine Ruby
Silver: Ursula Fingerlos
Bronze: Victoria Wicky

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Ursula Bruhin
Silver: Julie Pomagalski
Bronze: Heidi Renoth

2005

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Jasey Jay Anderson
Silver: Nicolas Huet
Bronze: Siegfried Grabner

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Antti Autti
Silver: Justin Lamoureux
Bronze: Kim Christiansen

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Seth Wescott
Silver: Francois Boivin
Bronze: Jayson Hale

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Jasey Jay Anderson
Silver: Urs Eiselin
Bronze: Nicolas Huet

Men's Big Air
Gold: Antti Autti
Silver: Matevez Petek
Bronze: Andreas Jakobssen

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Daniela Mueli
Silver: Heidi Neururer
Bronze: Doresia Krings

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Doriane Vidal
Silver: Manuela Laura Pesko
Bronze: Hannah Teter

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Lindsey Jacobellis
Silver: Karine Ruby
Bronze: Maelle Ricker

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Manuela Riegler
Silver: Svetlana Boldikova
Bronze: Doresia Krings

2007

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Simon Schoch
Silver: Philipp Schoch
Bronze: Rok Flander

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Mathieu Crepel
Silver: Kazuhiro Kokubo
Bronze: Brad Martin

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Xavier de Le Rue
Silver: Seth Wescott
Bronze: Nate Holland

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Rok Flander
Silver: Philipp Schoch
Bronze: Heinz Inniger

Men's Big Air
Gold: Mathieu Crepel
Silver: Antti Autti
Bronze: Janne Korpi

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Heidi Neururer
Silver: Marion Kreiner
Bronze: Doresia Krings

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Manuela Laura Pesko
Silver: Soko Yamaoko
Bronze: Paulina Ligocka

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Lindsey Jacobellis
Silver: Sandra Frei
Bronze: Helene Olafsen

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Ekaterina Tudigescheva
Silver: Amelie Kober
Bronze: Fraenzi Kohli

2009

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Benjamin Karl

Bronze: Patrick Bussler

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Ryo Aono
Silver: Jeff Batchelor
Bronze: Mathieu Crepel

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Markus Schairer
Silver: Xavier de Le Rue
Bronze: Mick Baumgartner

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Jasey Jay Anderson
Silver: Sylvain Dufour
Bronze: Matthew Morison

Men's Big Air
Gold: Markku Koski
Silver: Seppe Smits
Bronze: Stefan Gimpl

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Fraenzi Maegert-Kohli Karl
Silver: Doris Gunther
Bronze: Ekaterina Tudegesheva

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Jiayu Liu
Silver: Holly Crawford
Bronze: Paulina Ligocka

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Helene Olafsen
Silver: Olivia Nobs
Bronze: Mellie Francon

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Marion Kreiner
Silver: Doris Gunther
Bronze: Patrizia Kummer

2011

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Benjamin Karl,
Silver: Simon Schoch
Bronze: Rok Marguc

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Nathan Johnstone
Silver: Iouri Podladtchikov
Bronze: Markus Malin

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Alex Pullin
Silver: Seth Wescott
Bronze: Nate Holland

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Benjamin Karl
Silver: Rok Marguc
Bronze: Roland Fischnaller

Men's Big Air
Gold: Petja Piiroinen
Silver: Seppe Smits
Bronze: Rocco Van Straten

Men's Slopestyle
Gold: Seppe Smits
Silver: Niklas Mattsson
Bronze: Ville Paumola

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Hilde-Katrine Engeli
Silver: Nicolien Sauerbreij
Bronze: Claudia Riegler

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Holly Crawford
Silver: Ursina Haller
Bronze: Jiayu Liu

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Lindsey Jacobellis
Silver: Nelly Moenne Loccoz
Bronze: Dominique Maltais

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Alena Zavarzina
Silver: Claudia Riegler
Bronze: Doris Gunther

Women's Slopestyle
Gold: Enni Rukajarvi
Silver: Sarka Pancochova
Bronze: Shelly Gotlieb

2013

Men's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Rok Marguc
Silver: Justin Reiter
Bronze: Roland Fischnaller

Men's Halfpipe
Gold: Iouri Podladtchikov
Silver: Taku Hiraoka
Bronze: Markus Malin

Men's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Alex Pullin
Silver: Markus Schairer
Bronze: Stian Sivertzen

Men's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Benjamin Karl
Silver: Roland Fischnaller
Bronze: Vic Wild

Men's Big Air
Gold: Roope Tonteri
Silver: Niklas Mattsson
Bronze: Seppe Smits

Men's Slopestyle
Gold: Roope Tonteri
Silver: Mark McMorris
Bronze: Janne Korpi

Women's Parallel Slalom
Gold: Ekaterina Tudegesheva
Silver: Patrizia Kummer
Bronze: Amelie Kober

Women's Halfpipe
Gold: Arielle Gold
Silver: Holly Crawford
Bronze: Sophie Rodriguez

Women's Snowboard Cross
Gold: Maelle Ricker
Silver: Dominique Maltais
Bronze: Helene Olafsen

Women's Parallel Giant Slalom
Gold: Isabella Labock
Silver: Julia Dujmovits
Bronze: Amelie Kober

Women's Slopestyle
Gold: Spencer O'Brien
Silver: Sina Candrian
Bronze: Torah Bright

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